Tuesday, June 26, 2007

If they do it with songs, they'll do it to everything else too...

My friend Dave Tutin heard about a music competition that evaluates the quality of the entries through a "Music X-Ray."

From his blog:

"First, all songs will be analyzed by the innovative new Music Xray™ technology, which analyzes the underlying mathematical patterns in music and compares them to the patterns of past hits. All songs that score “blue", meaning that they have tremendous hit potential, will move on to the second round of judging, which includes deeper Music Xray™ analysis as well as human input."

Dave had some pretty strong feelings about it.

I do too.

For years, of course, we've had versions of this for movies from people like Syd Field and others. It's lead to a predictable three act structure in film that's meant boredom for two hours in the dark instead of real excitement. (Sorry, to advocates of the Campbell idea of universal stories, but I don't think he meant all stories should be told the same way.)

Painting by numbers....

4 comments:

Jeff Shattuck said...

I've been doing a lot more thinking about this software and I'm in the middle of writing a blog post regarding a few conclusions I've drawn. One thing I will say, though, for movies, is that getting computers to understand visual inputs is much harder than getting them to understand sonic inputs. That said, sure, someday computers will be able to 'judge' movies, but that day is a LONG way off in my opinion!

Malachy Walsh said...

Every 18 months, everything changes in tech.

So, who knows?

Fred Wickham said...

I went to art school in the pre-computer days. Quite a few painters had mathematical, geometrical ways of analyzing their compositions. They'd tie strings to pushpins at the corners of the stretcher bars and pull them across to conform to the golden mean, criss-crossing the canvas with chalk lines, and strangle the life out of any artistic impulse they might have had. Recipes for art don't work.

Dave Tutin said...

I remember an art director in advertising who talked constantly about the Golden Mean. His work was crap.